IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.

IGN.com

Last year, a startup in the gaming accessory biz, kontrolfreek, showed us prototypes of a controller add-on concept designed to offer gamers with standard control pads a degree of extra precision and touch in driving games. We liked the design and concept, and were stoked when the product finally came to market as the speedfreek (review). As such, when the company invited us to test a new prototype add-on designed for FPS titles we were happy to oblige.

Dubbed the FPS Freek, the new add-ons apply a similar concept of extending a standard control pad’s analog sticks, though unlike the driving oriented speedfreek’s “U” shaped sides, the FPS Freek goes vertical rather than horizontal. The concept immediately reminded us of one of the very first third-party controllers for the Xbox 360, the MadCatz GamePad Pro we reviewed in late 2005.


Read the complete review.